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Old 03-26-2007, 02:29 PM
Rhino Rhino is offline
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I live in east central Fl..

Anybody know the laws on lighting for yak fishing at night?? Thinking about doing some night fishing and just wondered.

Rhino
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Old 03-26-2007, 02:29 PM
Rhino Rhino is offline
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I live in east central Fl..

Anybody know the laws on lighting for yak fishing at night?? Thinking about doing some night fishing and just wondered.

Rhino
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Old 03-26-2007, 03:15 PM
aweiss44 aweiss44 is offline
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I believe coast guard rules are vessels OVER 16' and up to(what # I can't recall, but no kayaks are taht big), are required to have at least a white light visible in 360degress. Might want to check your local regs and see if they require anything. Please note, it is typically in your best interest to have some sort of easily visible light. check the safety forum, should be some good info there.
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Old 03-26-2007, 03:28 PM
aweiss44 aweiss44 is offline
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If you talk to the CG, I think whomever you talk to is gonna give you a different answer. here is something off of the FAQ on the coasites navigation site.

"

NAVIGATION RULES FAQ



Where do Kayaks and Canoes fit into the Navigation Rules? Neither the International nor Inland Navigation Rules address "kayaks" or "canoes" per se, except in regards to "vessels under oars" in Rule 25 regarding lights. One could infer that a "vessel under oars" should be treated as a "sailing vessel" since it is permitted to display the same lights as one, but, ultimately the issue of whom "gives way" would fall to what would be "required by the ordinary practice of seamen, or by the special circumstances of the case" (Rule 2).

Can I use Strobe Lights to be more visible at night? For any other lights beyond those specifically defined within the Navigation Rules they should be such lights as cannot be mistaken for the lights specified in these Rules, or do not impair their visibility or distinctive character, or interfere with the keeping of a proper look-out (Rule 20).
Displaying a strobe for “higher visibility” would confuse other vessels as to your navigational status (many aids to navigation use a strobe or flashing). Also, lights provide direction and aspect information to other boat operators. For example, if while operating my vessel I see a red light on my starboard side I know I am the give-way vessel (Rule 16, 17). The use of a strobe light could overwhelm a vessel’s navigation lights and cease to provide such crucial direction and aspect information to other boat operators.
Also, Rule 36 of the International Rules addresses signals to attract attention and for the purpose of [that] rule the use of high intensity intermittent or revolving lights, such as strobe lights, shall be avoided. Rule 37 of the Inland Rules addresses strobes in regards to distress signals so that when a vessel is in distress and requires assistance she shall use…a high intensity white light flashing at regular intervals from 50 to 70 times per minute.
Since strobe light use is to be avoided (International waters) or used as a distress signal (Inland waters), it cannot be used to routinely mark vessels operating on the water.
"
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Old 03-26-2007, 04:46 PM
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vakayakangler vakayakangler is offline
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I would like to reinforce the NO to the strobe.

I talked to several who have been cautioned about the use of strobes and ONE who was using a strobe to mark his yak and had a small coastie boat come running up and ask "what is your emergency!" Then they reamed him out and threatened to "take it a step farther" (though that step wasn't specified) when they discovered he was using the strobe just as a marker light.

We figured they could have cited him for false distress signal or something or another. I have spoken with a couple of our guys in the club about using small strobes just to warn them, but they didn't seem to be too concerned.

We use the river rock lantern. Best light we know of.

Best of luck.
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Old 03-26-2007, 06:15 PM
Yak-a-Lou Yak-a-Lou is offline
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Best of my knowledge, all you're required to carry in a paddlecraft is a light (or lantern) capable of signalling in time to avoid a collision. I think that generally is understood to be a light that is visible from a distance of one mile on a clear night.

Small led lights with fresh batteries are capable of being seen for over one mile on a clear night. That should fit MINIMUM requirements.

Anything over that is a bonus toward safety.

The River Rock Lanterns are quite popular here. I use a battery powered LED sternlight intended for use on motorized boats.

Jon, here at KFS advised against using red and green running lights ecause a motorboat might think thet you're another motorboat and believe that you're capable of manuvering as well and as fast as he can. A single white light displayed @ 360 degrees indicates a vessel at anchor which ios pretty close to being true with the speeds we paddle at.

Strobe lights are intended for emergency use only.

Hope that helps.

I just finished day one of a three day USCG class. I'll try to remeber to ask them tomorrow just to be certain.
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Old 03-27-2007, 05:25 PM
Yak-a-Lou Yak-a-Lou is offline
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Confirmed as written above.
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Old 03-28-2007, 04:00 AM
Rhino Rhino is offline
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Thanks guys, appreciate the good words of wisdom. I scored 3 River Rock lights at a target. Last three they had. I can't believe how bright they are for such a little light!!

Happy yakking.......

Rhino
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Old 03-29-2007, 03:29 AM
RiverRaider RiverRaider is offline
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<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">"what is your emergency!" Then they reamed him out and threatened to "take it a step farther" (though that step wasn't specified) when they discovered he was using the strobe just as a marker light. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Jim I know you are %110 percent correct in this matter...

But... The Coasties did see him well enough to get their undivided attention... that would make me feel a little less guilty I think

But your right... strobes are a no no unless used properly.

At night I wear an LED headlamp which I can easily "sweep" over any part of my boat, and I have some strategicaly placed reflective tape to sweep it over... how effective this is? I dunno' but it makes me feel a little better.

One night last seasaon, I was sitting there on the Yak, rigging up.. before I looked down, I did a good visual sweep of the are to make sure I was alone, I looked down maybe 15 seconds, and then look up to see a samll (maybe 16') alumminum Skiff heading straight for me (with no running lights whatsoever!!!!) The pilot of the boat locked eyes with me and adjusted himself to avoid me just in time... I was lit up per regulation... it didnt seem good enough for that yahoo.
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Old 03-29-2007, 07:04 AM
ValFitzAndrew ValFitzAndrew is offline
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The Coast Guard Aux who gave a presentation at the last TKAA meeting allowed that the fed law required the same lightingon a 16ft or less paddle craft as that required on a same sizes sail boat, ie running lights starbord and port plus a white light shown astern. Thats the LAW but he readily admitted that a good all round white kight was probably safer for us.

Thats what I show plus I wear a headlamp too.
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