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  #11  
Old 07-18-2009, 08:19 PM
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meathook meathook is offline
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Default How to make one

I found this a few months ago when I was researching kayak safety.

RESCUE STIRRUP (and how to make one)





The rescue stirrup (also known as a rescue sling) is as simple as a long loop of rope. This rope will hold the paddle & float as an outrigger to the kayak deck and serve as a step so the paddler can use the stronger muscle groups of the legs to lift themself back onto the kayak from water that is over head.

You will likely not find a rescue stirrup in any kayak shop. This is a homemade device, custom to your needs and easy to build. Start off with a long rope, maybe a recycled roof rack strap, about 12 foot long or more. The simplest of slings is just a big loop, a circle you could say, that is about head high when held up in front of you. I like to use a 3/8” nylon rope, twisted or braided, because it is soft on the hands and easy to tie. Nylon will absorb and hold water. Polypropylene will not hold water (or mildew) but it is rougher and harder to tie.

The stirrup can be enhanced with some optional features if desired. Nylon rope will not necessarily float, so I have added a short length of pipe insulation, about 16”, and knotted it in place. This padded section can be useful in the “assisted version” of the Deep-Water Re-Entry. It contacts the paddle shaft and can prevent slippage.

On the other end I have added a short length of plastic tubing, about 12”, to serve as a stirrup. This is also knotted in place. The tubing can be an old scrap of recycled garden hose if you have it. It will help the stirrup end sink as well as hold open a foothold that will be easy to find. If you use polypro rope that floats you may need the tubing to help sink it down to foot level.

You should be able to get everything you need to make your own stirrup at a local hardware store, or maybe recycle from stuff in your garage or basement.




I dig the custom strap though. The clip seems like it would be easier for me.
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  #12  
Old 07-19-2009, 09:02 AM
Excalibur Excalibur is offline
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Default Routing of the strap ?

Ok -- I'm a larger paddler and read through this. I've heard about slings but haven't really figured out how they worked. This is definintely more thorough than what I've read before -- so thank you !

Couple of questions:
1) It looks like the sling starts as a giant loop of nylon strapping and you are a) looping it to the paddle, then b) threading it through the scupper hole. From the pics, it looks like you're threading it through the scupper from under the kayak hull and up through then out the top. Is that right ? If so, do you sometimes find it hard to thread through the scupper ? I have a WS tarpon 100 -- my scuppers are relatively narrow.

I've heard that the scuppers on the tarpons are potential weakspots -- is it really safe to put that tension on the scuppers ?

2) If I wasn't going to go w/ the scupper feed plan and instead opted for the brass snap concept like the nice premade one shown w/ garden hose, would that potentially put too much force on the pad eye ?

Just not sure about how to accomplish the rescue w/o potentially damaging my boat.

Thanks,
Mark
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  #13  
Old 07-19-2009, 04:05 PM
Bass Knuckles Bass Knuckles is offline
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Default Follow-up to questions

1) It looks like the sling starts as a giant loop of nylon strapping and you are a) looping it to the paddle, then b) threading it through the scupper hole. From the pics, it looks like you're threading it through the scupper from under the kayak hull and up through then out the top. Is that right ?

YES

If so, do you sometimes find it hard to thread through the scupper ? I have a WS tarpon 100 -- my scuppers are relatively narrow.

I DONT HAVE A PROBLEM WITH MY OCEAN KAYAK OR MY HOBIE KAYAK (ON THE HOBIE I PRACTED USING THE DAGGERBOARD SCUPPER

I've heard that the scuppers on the tarpons are potential weakspots -- is it really safe to put that tension on the scuppers ?

I DONT KNOW ABOUT THE TARPONS SORRY. BUT I WOULD THINK YOU WOULD BEND THE PADDLE BEFORE DAMAGING THE SCUPPER. AGAIN IM NOT SURE.

2) If I wasn't going to go w/ the scupper feed plan and instead opted for the brass snap concept like the nice premade one shown w/ garden hose, would that potentially put too much force on the pad eye ?

I WOULD MAKE SURE YOU USE A BRASS EYE AND USE BOLTS WITH A LARGE WASHER BEHIND IT I THINK YOU SHOULD BE FINE. THE SET UP I HAVE IS FOR MY SON, WHO CAN DO SELF RESCUE BUT DOESNT HAVE THE STRENGTH AFTER 2 HOURS OF PADDLING. HE ALSO ONLY WEIGHS 120 POUNDS LOL

Just not sure about how to accomplish the rescue w/o potentially damaging my boat.

SCREW THE YAK YOU NEED TO SURVIVE.
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  #14  
Old 07-20-2009, 12:18 PM
FlyKing FlyKing is offline
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I turtled up on the new river this weekend and the experience got me thinking about self rescue.

First a couple of observations.

1. Don’t expect everyone to drop what they’re doing to come to your rescue. Most of the boaters on the water watched me with detached interest.
2. The dynamics of self-rescue in swift moving water is quite different than that practiced in a calm pond. In my case, I swam/pushed the Yak to shallower water and climbed back in.

While I didn’t use the self-rescue techniques I practiced in deep water with Kayak Master Intructor Mike Aronoff, I was VERY glad that that my first combat turtle wasn’t the first time I was dumped. The practice helped me remain calm when I had to deal with the real thing. I had enough presence of mind to keep my boat downstream of me and I remembered to grab my paddle.

As I said, the experience got me thinking and I have a new self rescue technique that you might want to try. I call it the SSR. (Steve’s Rescue Technique)

It is my own invention and should work with any SOT and possibly some canoes. I think it is elegant and so simple that someone else must have thought of it first. However, I didn’t see anything on the net.

My idea requires a cam strap with hooks. I use the Thule 855 Quickdraw Bow-Stern Tie-down but any cam strap that has a hook at one end and can use the cam ratchet to form an adjustable loop at the other end will work. Simply hook onto the far side carry handle and drop the loop (stirrup) in the water on the near side. Use the cam to adjust as needed.

You could also fabricate your custom rescue stirrup using a 5” piece of radiator hose, heavy garden hose or PVC; a length of poly rope or nylon strap and a steel hook or carbiner.

Thread one end through the hose and tie off to form your stirrup. Attach the hook or carbiner to the tag end.

Test in the water to establish the ideal length for you and your Yak. Attach the carbiner to the far side on the carry handle or other attachment point.

You can wind the rope around the hose and store in your PFD.

Note: Test in calm water and wear your PFD, please. I suspect that this method may not work for heavier kayakers.

Bass, thanks for the detailed instructions. I'm going out and practice some more.
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  #15  
Old 07-20-2009, 06:59 PM
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RPB RPB is offline
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Thanks, I installed a couple zigzag cleats and used leashes/rope to make a ladder type step before, but I really like that garden hose step, looks like it's easier on the feets.
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  #16  
Old 07-22-2009, 10:36 AM
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SeaFlea once made a sling and called it, I think an EZ UP or some thing like that. he made many for the Wolfpack.
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  #17  
Old 07-22-2009, 08:35 PM
Excalibur Excalibur is offline
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Default Another option ?

Ok -- so I've been thinking more about this rescue sling concept for my tarpon 100. I was concerned about running a nylon strap through the scupper or attaching via a clip to a pad eye and I think I've come up w/ a new concept for how I might use a sling. Wanted to throw it out there and get folks input on gotchas that I'm not considering:


So...my idea is to buy about 10 feet of nylon strap (like what was shown in the pics)

I'd then put a piece of hose or something in the middle to make a stirrup. I'd knot the other end a few times so it won't budge. Now I'd have a giant loop. About 1 foot up from the stirrup I'd make another overhand knot to isolate the stirrup to a certain portion of the loop. Somewhere in all this, I'd probably have a float too (so I wouldn't lose it in the water)

When I turtle, I would go to the middle of my boat and hold the knotted portion of the loop. Next, I would "throw" the stirrup end up over top of the cockpit to land on the other side in the water. From there, I would reach under the boat and grab the stirrup end then bring it under the boat back to me. At this point, I'd have both the knotted end & stirrup end in hand and a loop of line running over the cockpit, down the side and across the bottom. Next, I'd insert the knotted end through my carry handle just to keep the loop in a specific spot relative to the cockpit (not to bear weight) Finally, I'd loop the stirrup end through the knotted end and draw it tight against the side of the hull (essentially looping the entire stirrup around my kayak w/ a pass through the carry handle). From there, I'd mount the stirrup and climb in. To me, this seems like it would work because the point at which the loop binds on itself would be right at the side of the boat -- thus, when weight was applied, it would pull the boat up on its side like shown in the pics.

Ok so...shoot some holes in my plan --

Thanks,
Mark
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  #18  
Old 07-23-2009, 07:08 AM
Odin Odin is offline
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Bass...

This really is a great thread. Thank you for taking the initiative and going through the process of putting it all together.
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  #19  
Old 07-23-2009, 12:44 PM
FlyKing FlyKing is offline
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Default Excalibur - I like it

Sames that this would counter-act the weight when climbing in. I'm going to try out a couple of these in August. Think some of the guys in the DelMarva forum are getting together then to practice self rescue.
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  #20  
Old 07-23-2009, 07:43 PM
Excalibur Excalibur is offline
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Default If I can...

get a pass for that day, I'll be venturing out to SPSP too

Mark
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